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Amarra Residence

Residential Portfolio  >  Amarra Residence

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Amarra Residence Exterior Detail
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Amarra Residence Dining
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Amarra Residence Kitchen
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Amarra Residence Living
Amarra Residence Hallway
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Amarra Residence Media
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Amarra Residence Sitting
Amarra Residence Master Bath
Amarra Residence Artwork
Amarra Residence Bedroom
Amarra Residence Vanity
Amarra Residence Rear Stair
Amarra Residence Rear Exterior
Amarra Residence Mudroom
Amarra Residence Bath
Amarra Residence Hallway Sculpture
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Materiality and simplicity define the architecture for this transitional home under 4,000 square feet in the Barton Creek neighborhood in West Austin. The lot presented a challenge as it was only 69 feet wide and dropped substantially to the rear (north) side making the single-story plan even more challenging. The hill country view opens up to the north and east while the west allows for privacy. The plan called for an approach from the west side and swoops in around a large majestic live oak tree in the front. The front court transitions to a small garden courtyard upon entry, layered with low maintenance native vegetation and landscaping. The plan organizes itself into two distinct wings: the more private bedrooms fall to the left (west) and the larger public spaces open to the back and east with large glazing walls that did not require screening. The spaces are simple with clean lines defined by simple beams and ceiling breaks. Light becomes paramount in layering and contouring the spaces defined by the white neutral walls. Warm wood textures and neutral grays become playfully interspersed with this language. The Norman brick cladding is used to define the scale of this transitional home as it sets the tone for the architecture. The residence looks out to the expansive hill country views to the north while the kitchen frames the greenbelt and natural vegetation on the east side. While the design evolved from the constraints of the site, the house responds and takes advantage of the light and defines its own scale despite the tight footprint.

Interior Designer: Kelle Contine Interior Design

Photographer: Chase Daniel

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